Securing 5G Infrastructure from Cybersecurity Risks


Potential Threat Vectors to 5G Infrastructure

By: National Risk Management Center

The deployment of 5G has begun, and with it, a wealth of benefits that has the potential to impact every aspect of our lives and work. With faster connectivity, ultra-low latency, greater network capacity, 5G will redefine the operations of critical infrastructure activities from the plant floor to the cloud. It will enable large-scale connections, capabilities, and services that can pave the way for smart cities, remote surgery, autonomous vehicles, and other emergent technologies. However, these capabilities also make 5G networks an attractive target for criminals and foreign adversaries to exploit for valuable information and intelligence and even global disruption.

To secure the full scope of 5G use cases, it is critical that strong cybersecurity practices are incorporated within the design and development of 5G technology. In March 2020, the White House developed the National Strategy to Secure 5G, which outlines how the Nation will safeguard 5G infrastructure domestically and abroad. The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the National Security Agency, and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, as part of the Enduring Security Framework (ESF)—a cross-sector, public-private working group—initiated an assessment of the cybersecurity and vulnerabilities to 5G infrastructure. The ESF established the 5G Threat Model Working Panel which developed this paper, Potential Threat Vectors to 5G Infrastructure, to enhance understanding of the threats posed to 5G adoption.

The Working Panel reviewed existing bodies of public and private research and analysis to identify and generate an aggregated list of known and potential threats to the 5G environment. From that list, they identified three primary threat vectors areas—Policy and Standards, Supply Chain, and 5G Systems Architecture—and within these threat vectors, 11 sub-threats were identified as additional points of vulnerability for threat actors to exploit (i.e., open standards, counterfeit parts, and multi-access edge computing). This paper represents the beginning of the Working Panel’s thinking on the types of risks introduced by 5G adoption in the Unites States, and not the culmination of it.

With the promise of connectivity between billions of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, it is critical that government and industry collaborate to ensure that cybersecurity is prioritized within the design and development of 5G technology. Download this paper to learn more about these threats. For more information about CISA’s role in 5G, visit www.cisa.gov/5G